THE OUTCOME OF THE PATTERN 1 & 2

December 12, 2019 – January 26, 2020

Oona Doherty & Luca Truffarelli / Hayahisa Tomiyasu \ Thomas Breitenfeld / Böhler & Orendt / Liesel Burisch / Mark Dion / Silas Inoue /Nina Sten-Knudsen / Mårten Lange / Guillaume Simoneau  / Matthias Ziegler Sound Tracks: Stine Grøn / Katrin Petroschkat / Tania Ballentine / Kate Tempest \ Ann Noel / everyedition

<p>Hayahisa Tomiyasu</p>

Hayahisa Tomiyasu

1 – ongoing
Oona Doherty & Luca Truffarelli / Hayahisa Tomiyasu
curated by Jörg Koopmann

2 – altering
A small Salon for tiny and big creatures and creations
Thomas Breitenfeld / Böhler & Orendt / Liesel Burisch / Mark Dion / Silas Inoue /Nina Sten-Knudsen / Mårten Lange / Guillaume Simoneau  / Matthias Ziegler \\. Sound Tracks: Stine Grøn / Katrin Petroschkat / Tania Ballentine / Kate Tempest
curated by Lene Harbo Pedersen

& in the wintergarden: Ann Noel / everyedition : YOU

The curatorial director of the Lothringer13 Halle, Jörg Koopmann says goodbye to the art-space with a final exhibition, which will start 12.12. at 7pm with a one-time performance. Title of the two-story exhibition: 

The outcome of the pattern 1 & 2, for which he himself designed the part 1_ongoing in the Halle and the Danish curator Lene Harbo Pedersen designed the part 2_altering in the Nest.

The large hall offers plenty of room for only two artists. The Japanese Hayahisa Tomiyasu, former master student of Peter Piller, brings his photo sequences in homeopathic doses on the walls. The titles are short, the formats are small and the presentation minimal. Hayahisa notices and pursues processes that are self-evident, surprising in their normality and not stuck in concepts. His series tells the story of a rhinoceros that describes eternity, a penis on a city stroll or Hayas encounters with a city fox. Hayahisa became known, however, with the series TTP, a patient study of people and their relationship to a public pingpong table. So poetic and amused has photography rarely accompanied the mundane course of life.

The work and presence of the artist Oona Doherty from Belfast are combined in a rather spacious way. The celebrated dancer comes to Munich for the first time and brings along a new choreography that grows with earlier video episodes and an installation to a certain experimental exhibition format. Oona’s description of her Munich performance plans are as direct and straightforward as she dances: “I want to present a work in three parts: Death of a Hunter car-instillation. (A nod to all the joyriders who have passed.), The Hard to be soft movie series with episodes one to four, and Ketamin memories! Hunter slips into a stream of consciousness with 3 levels of transcendence: A: A mother’s son, B: mistakes of a father. and C: An Angel. Dj truff truff closes the night. ”

Recently, the British art magazine ArtReview wrote, “Watching Oona Doherty dance while having something supernatural, like witnessing a crowd marching and wriggling through a woman’s body.” What sounds like a loss of control, however, is a precise and radical change in their body language. In doing so, she does not simply switch between female and male, but embodies the many and varied tears in the presence and self-image of the people, who Oona carefully studies for her choreographies in her environment. A stage-driven, dynamic and loving picture of a precarious working class, with movements, gestures and facial expressions that go through all the channels of physically stored experiences and tiks.

The groundfloor is filled by two artists who can elaborately dissect current patterns of behavior and translate them into touching direct language.

The structures expand one floor up in the Nest, a deliberately very densely filled room in which constant and natural changes and their assignments are traced. Alterations – A small Salon for tiny and big creatures and creations is what Lene Harbo Pedersen calls this compression and brings together works by nine artists.  All of these works put different livelihoods into larger relationships and perspectives and bring them into close connections. This salon grew in the spirit of the feminist theorist Donna Haraway, who formulated the Chthulucene era, which – unlike in the Anthropocene – does not place people at the center of thought and history, but rather the life and relationships of other species and creatures.

Harbo Pedersens transforms the nest into a contemporary salon with reference to the idea of the French salon, a product of the Enlightenment. “Thinking of the given situation that has brought us to a new wave of enlightenment, a radical one, where values, ethics and language has to change. The French salons in the 18th century opened up to giving voice to women. I give space to that altering with sound tracks of contemporary female voices. One can hear a danish singer who invented her own language for healing, a choir that salutes former times at Lothringer13, singing about algae’s and a million years ago. There’s also Kate and her political, emotional Tempest … and another singer wonders ‘Maybe I am like the River’ a mantra that might follow one for a while, ”comments Lene Harbo with a wink.

This exhibition may also subtly echo the topics of Lothringer13 in the past 6 years. Ultimately, and especially at the contemplative wintertime and the step into a new decade, The outcome of the pattern follows the struggle for good energies and hope, wishing for perseverance and confidence.

<p>Oona Doherty</p>

Oona Doherty

<p>Liesel Burisch</p>

Liesel Burisch

<p>Guillaume Simoneau</p>

Guillaume Simoneau

<p><i>A small Salon for tiny and big creatures and creations</i></p>

A small Salon for tiny and big creatures and creations

<p>Mårten Lange</p>

Mårten Lange